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Posts Tagged ‘Thad Allen’

Now Feds Having Problems Finding Oil In the Gulf. Go Figure, Not Mother Nature, A Real DC Hero

July 27, 2010

For 86 days, oil spewed into the Gulf of Mexico from BP’s damaged well, dumping some 200 million gallons of crude into sensitive ecosystems. BP and the federal government have amassed an army to clean the oil up, but there’s one problem — they’re having trouble finding it.

At its peak last month, the oil slick was the size of Kansas, but it has been rapidly shrinking, now down to the size of New Hampshire.

Today, ABC News surveyed a marsh area and found none, and even on a flight out to the rig site Sunday with the Coast Guard, there was no oil to be seen.

Even the federal government admits that locating the oil has become a problem.

“It is becoming a very elusive bunch of oil for us to find,” said National Incident Cmdr. Thad Allen.

Still, it doesn’t mean that all the oil that gushed for weeks is gone. Thousands of small oil patches remain below the surface, but experts say an astonishing amount has disappeared, reabsorbed into the environment.

“[It’s] mother nature doing her job,” said Ed Overton, a professor of environmental studies at Louisiana State University.

Not Mother Nature…AquaMan…… Oil and AquaMan don’t mix… Hoping AquaMan attacks Moratorium Man. A Real DC Hero..

 

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Gulf boats having trouble finding any oil: US official

July 22, 2010

WASHINGTON — Some 750 boats drafted in to scoop up oil from the Gulf of Mexico are having “trouble” finding any crude in the sea, a top US official said Wednesday, almost a week after a busted well was capped.

“We are starting to have trouble finding oil,” US pointman Admiral Thad Allen, who is in charge of handling the government’s response, told reporters.

The boats, which have been drafted in to skim oil off the surface of the Gulf, are “really having to search for the oil in some cases” around the area of the capped well, he added.

The US government also said that some 34.6 million gallons of oil water had been recovered from the Gulf since the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon exploded and sank in April.

BP finally managed to stop the flow of oil into the Gulf on Thursday, when a new 30-foot (10-meter) giant cap was put in place.

The government has allowed BP to keep the cap shut since then, extending permission in 24-hour stints.

Allen said some of the boats used in the skimming operations were being brought ashore for repairs, as attention turned more towards cleaning up the oil that has already washed ashore along five Gulf coasts.

The missing oil will be going with  drilling companies as they leave  the Gulf of Mexico. Look for a shortage in oil and jobs in  the future..

 

Hoping Well Cap Pressure Between 8,000-9,000 PSI

July 13, 2010

NEW ORLEANS – With a tight new cap freshly installed on its leaking well in the Gulf of Mexico, BP planned gradual tests starting Tuesday to see if the device can stop oil from pouring into the sea for the first time in nearly three months.

Engineers will slowly shut down three valves that let oil flow through the 75-ton capping device to see if it can withstand the pressure of the erupting crude and to watch if leaks spring up elsewhere in the well. National Incident Commander Thad Allen said the process of closing the valves, one by one, would start later Tuesday.

If pressure inside the cap stays in a target range for roughly six hours after the valves are closed, there will be more confidence the cap can contain the oil, Allen told a news briefing at BP’s U.S. headquarters in Houston. That target range is 8,000 to 9,000 pounds per square inch, he said. Anything lower could indicate another leak in the well.

Hoping well cap pressure  will stay between 8,000-9,000 psi helping Dow Jones pressure  to 10,000-12,000. Anything below 10,000 shows a larger leak in the economy.